To coincide with National Poetry Day 1995, the British television programme The Bookworm conducted a poll to discover the nation's favourite poems, and subsequently published the winning poems in book form. Although the origin of the poem was disputed until later in her life, Mary Frye's authorship was purportedly confirmed in 1998 after research by Abigail Van Buren, a newspaper columnist. In the open prairie Filled with rich natural images, her writing recites meaningful events that can guide a reader feeling lost in our confusing, hi-tech world. I am the sunlight on ripened grain. Chief | For patients who had terminal illnesses, Dr. Domer wanted to be able to provide hospice and palliative care. “Our elders tell us they want to die with dignity — the way they lived,” he said. Thank you. The happy hunting ground (Instead of these last four words there is also this version: "I am not dead. Mitzie Begay, an elderly Navajo woman set out to change this. Only designated tribal members are permitted to touch and bury the dead. A totally engrossing narrative. Through the use of a poem and speaking about death in a nuanced manner, the New York Times reports that she has been able to speak to many of the community's elderly about death in a culturally sensitive way. Several notable choral compositions, pop songs, and other creative works have been based on "Do Not Stand at My Grave and Weep", adapting lines from Frye's poem as lyrics. Spirit | I am the diamond glints on snow. “After a patient dies, you don’t hang on, because the deceased is no longer on Mother Earth.

They are happy “It is better to have less thunder in the mouth and more lightning in the hand.” – Apache, 5. I only left".). “We will be known forever by the tracks we leave.” – Dakota, 18. Iroquois Woman | It’s a compassionate approach, and it’s in accord with the twin values that Navajos share with mainstream American culture — individual autonomy and personal dignity.”. Please email us if you have written a Native American poem and would like to see it displayed on the site. [5], Frye circulated the poem privately, never publishing it. It is the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. I am not there. And feed When they skin Death and dying from a Native American spirituality perspective; Institute of Medicine . Their faith is strong, © Copyright 2016 by Jack Scoltock. When someone dies in the family hogan, for example, a hole is made in the north wall to let the good spirit out, and then the hogan is abandoned. Dream Catcher | Several Swedish versions exist.

Until last month, the program’s director was Dr. Timothy Domer, a geriatrician who practiced medicine for more than 20 years in this remote, high-desert, red-rock landscape on the eastern fringe of the vast Navajo reservation. Spirit Of The Cheyenne | I did not die. This is at the request of the copyright holder. "Do Not Stand at My Grave and Weep" (choral song by Libera): "A Thousand Winds" (song by Man Arai): Japanese singer-songwriter, "The Soft Stars that Shine at Night" (choral composition by David Bedford): In 2006, several choirs in the United Kingdom commissioned a choral work from, "Do Not Stand at My Grave and Weep" (composition by, "Do Not Stand at My Grave and Weep" (song by Harry Manx and Kevin Breit): A song of this title, with lyrics adapted from the poem, appears on the album, "You Will Make It" (song by Jem): The poem appears at the end of the song "You Will Make It" by Welsh singer-songwriter. It’s a compassionate approach, and it’s in accord with the twin values that Navajos share with mainstream American culture — individual autonomy and personal dignity.”. . Wasichu | Luci Tapahonso, who was born in Shiprock, N.M. in 1953, promotes literature and poetry as well as the Navajo language and culture. . The wisdom of the native American Indians is timeless and powerful enough to transform human consciousness, so that we can lead a peaceful, close-to-nature, compassionate life. Poor | “Tell me and I’ll forget. Involve me, and I’ll understand.” – Tribe Unknown, 4. (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Return to Native American Poems and Prayers, After Death | A dead person’s name is never spoken. This song is part of Leah's 2013 album. “All plants are our brothers and sisters. On 29 August 2010, the Swedish newspaper Dagens Nyheter carried the following short English version: "I am thousand winds that blow / I am the diamond glints on snow / I am the sunlight, I am the rain / Do not stand on my grave and cry / I am not there / I did not die". The stories and poems of this book come from a place of long horizons and a huge sky. The vehicle was a poem: “When that time comes, when my last breath leaves me, I choose to die in peace to meet Shi’ dy’ in” — the creator. When you awaken in the morning's hush James S. Taylor, a Navajo scholar, thought that poetry was the perfect way to introduce difficult topics to the culture: “Using the poem and open-ended questions allows nuanced and respectful solutions to this problem because it gives people the opportunity to discuss end-of-life planning impersonally. “When a man moves away from nature his heart becomes hard.” – Lakota, 17. Life Must Go On - A Navaho Prayer. The NYT has the story: [2][3][4], There have been many claimants to the poem's authorship, including attributions to traditional and Native American origins. With Poem, Broaching the Topic of Death OUTREACH Gina Nez, right, and Mitzie Begay visited Jimmy Begay (no relation), 87, a “code talker” in World War …